Monthly Archives: June 2016

How to Clean Makeup Brushes

clean makeup brushes

If you read this blog, you know that I am a stickler for sanitary makeup practices and that even cleaning your brushes isn’t enough. But it IS a start, and since I get a lot of questions from models and clients alike on how to clean makeup brushes, it seems that a lot of people aren’t sure how to do it or how often.

Pros like me and anyone sharing makeup brushes need to sanitize their brushes after every use. I use liquid brushes cleansers for this–a lot of companies make them, including Cinema Secrets and Bare Escentuals. They are fast drying (we’re talking mere minutes), and even if you are the only person who uses your brushes, I would recommend using them after every application. Dirty brushes will give you muddy results, and no one wants that. I’m pretty sure we’ve all had the experience of dipping a brush in eyeshadow and a different (old) color surprising us once it makes it to our lids. Yuck.

The best way to use these brush cleansers is to get a small container, like a medicine cup, and spray or pour a small amount of it. Swirl your brush around in the liquid, and then on a towel or folded over paper towel, gently brush your makeup brush back and forth. Repeat until your brush doesn’t leave dirty marks.

Now for the deep clean. This has to be done once a week, for everyone. Yes, if you have used your brushes even once during the week, you’re going to need to wash them. For this, you really don’t need to buy a new product. You can use a face cleanser, hand soap, or shampoo. I dispense a small amount into my palm, and then swirl all my brushes around in it, one by one. Once they all have shampoo (or whichever product I used) on them, I rinse them one by one, massaging the bristles to make sure they’re super clean. Then I lay them flat on a towel for them to dry. You never want to dry them standing up, or it will loosen the ferrule and damage your brushes.

While it’s time-consuming, it’s well worth it to take good care of your brushes. Stay clean!

xx Dana

Why You Should Start Tightlining Your Eyes

tightlining

You probably line your lower waterline on a semi-regular basis, but if you’re like most people, tightlining isn’t part of your makeup routine. Perhaps you don’t even know what it means! To tightline is to line the upper waterline–that strip of skin underneath your eyelashes and above your eyes.

“Why do I need to put eyeliner there?” you’re probably asking. Here are a few reasons:

  1. It helps your eyes stand out more by creating contrast. As we get older, the skin underneath our lashes gets more exposed. Lining it helps eyes pop in a way that is subtle and natural.
  2. It gives the illusion of thicker lashes.
  3. It will help the liner on your lower waterline stay put. Yes, really! When it wears away, most of it is really just transferring to your upper waterline. If you already line this area, this won’t happen.
  4. It’s a great way to line your eyes if you have small lids or hooded eyes, because it takes up literally no lid space.
  5. If you want to rock a no-makeup look but secretly wear makeup, this is a great way to draw attention to your eyes, and no one will suspect your secret.

If tightlining is too uncomfortable for you because you flinch a lot when a pencil is coming at your eyes (guilty), here’s a trick–line your lower waterline, blink quickly and firmly, and repeat. The eyeliner will transfer to your upper waterline. Done!

 

xx Dana